Scrip is part of the Business Intelligence Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC’s registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use. For high-quality copies or electronic reprints for distribution to colleagues or customers, please call +44 (0) 20 3377 3183

Printed By

UsernamePublicRestriction
UsernamePublicRestriction

Cooperative Research Centre for Diagnostics

http://diagnosticscrc.org

Latest From Spine Next SA

Market & Industry Briefs

Brief summaries of recent medtech market and industry developments. This month we cover a new GAO report that ups the pressure on the medical imaging market; Cordis Corp.'s suspension of its PFO closure device program; Atritech's PMA for stroke prevention; Zimmer's acquisition of Abbott Spine; and the US market for contraception devices and procedures.
Medical Device

Start-Up News: New Twists in Spine and Orthopedics

A brief discussion of a few new companies in the spine and orthopedic surgery market that presented at Medtech Insight and Windhover Information's IN SPINE & ORTHOPEDICS conference in Las Vegas, December 2006.
Medical Device Platform Technologies

BioAssets: Convergence as Marketing Play

Most drug and device companies approach convergence as a product development issue--the actual combination in a single product of both device and pharmaceutical attributes. But what if convergence were played out as part of a marketing strategy? That's one of the possibilities being explored by BioAssets, a drug company with a novel approach to the use of TNF inhibitors in spine, who hopes to tap into the strong customer relationships that spine device companies have with surgeons.
BioPharmaceutical Medical Device

St. Francis Medical: Staking Ground in Dynamic Stabilization

Spine, one of the device industry's hottest, most fertile segments, has a history of quick adoption and quick retrenchment (read spinal cages) and standards of care that are anything but gold standards. Perhaps the most interesting example of spine's ambivalent attitude toward technology is artificial discs. Artificial discs caught fire a couple of years ago in the US and promised to be the device industry's next blockbuster technology. But before the first-generation discs had even made it to market, spine surgeons-and the companies that develop new technology-were already onto the next big thing: dynamic stabilization devices, which fall somewhere between the motion-preserving qualities of disc replacement and the stabilization that cages offer. Dynamic stabilization devices are too new for their role in treating spine problems to be fully assessed, but a host of companies are already lining up. One of the first: St. Francis Medical Technologies, which after a difficult struggle with the FDA to get its device approved, is ready to take on the US market and test the potential of at least one category of dynamic stabilization devices: interspinous spacer devices.
Medical Device Business Strategies
See All
Advertisement
Advertisement
UsernamePublicRestriction

Register